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Post-school-destinations-annual-report-2017-thumbPost-school-destinations-technical-report-2017-thumb

The 2017 post-school destinations and expectations annual report (PDF, 3.3MB) presents key findings from the 2017 survey of secondary students' post-school destinations. Over 6,995 young people shared their experiences with the research team. Surveys were completed by early school leavers and Year 12 completers across government and non-government schools. The report also presents the findings from a longitudinal follow-up with 2,704 students who responded to the survey in 2014 and 3,342 students who responded in 2016.

 

The 2017 post-school destinations technical report (PDF, 3.5MB) outlines the project background and overview, survey methodology, questionnaire design and data processing undertaken by the Social Research Council (SRC) to produce the annual report. It also includes materials used by SRC to undertake the project.

 

About the report

The post-school destinations report provides information about:
• post-school education pathways, attainments and destinations of young people in NSW
• factors that drive engagement, retention, education achievement and pathway choices for young people in NSW
• findings from longitudinal follow-ups with students who responded to surveys in 2014 and 2016, and Year 10 students in 2017.
Over 13,000 early school leavers and Year 12 completers across government and non-government schools completed surveys in 2017.
The NSW Department of Education and NSW Skills Board have collaborated on the annual survey since 2014.

Main findings

Further education and training was the most common post-school destination
The majority of Year 12 completers (69.9%) and early school leavers (55.4%) were in some form of education and training six months after leaving school. However, the proportion of Year 12 completers entering some form of education and training has continued to decline since peaking in 2015, and the proportion of Year 12 completers and early school leavers entering VET also decreased in 2017.

Post-school destinations differ between Year 12 completers and early school leavers
The main post-school destination among Year 12 completers continued to be a Bachelor degree (50.1%), however Year 12 completers identifying as Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander had lower rates of entering a Bachelor degree (23.9%) than other Year 12 completers. The main post-school destination for early school leavers continued to be an apprenticeship (30.0%).
Reasons for leaving school early varied
The most common self-reported reasons for leaving school early continue to relate to wanting to pursue employment and career opportunities, school ‘not being for them’ and not liking school or teachers. Less frequently cited reasons included not coping at school or failing subjects, finding school boring, wanting to study elsewhere, ill-health and being bullied.

Published in Research report

LowSES Ext Partnerships ProgRpt 5

Authors: Louise Watson, Jenny Chesters, Affrica Taylor, Adam Murray, Stephen Lamb, Michael Long, Merryn Davies and Esther Doecke

Evaluator Company/Business: University of Canberra and University of Melbourne

Year: 2014

URL or PDF: Download the Evaluation of school external partnerships: Bridges and Barriers, the challenges of building external partnerships in low SES school communities, progress report 5 (PDF, 1.03MB)

Summary:  This report presents survey data on teachers’ perceptions of the effectiveness of external partnerships undertaken by their schools under the low socioeconomic status school communities National Partnership (Low-SES NP). Survey participants were from 636 schools in both government and non-government sectors with a total of 2,408 respondents. Survey findings indicate that the Low-SES NP has had a positive impact on low-SES schools’ capacity to engage with parents and carers and the wider community on a number of indicators. The findings also indicate that levels of school-parent engagement in secondary schools remain lower than in primary schools, and that teachers’ perceptions of the impact of the Low-SES NP differs, according to their age, length of service in their current school, and their professional role.

Published in Evaluation repository

Lit Num NP Prog Eval Focus On Reading 

Authors: Alison Wallace, Benita Power, Lee Holloway, Chloe Harkness
Evaluator Company/Business:
Urbis 
Year:
2012
URL or PDF: 
Download the External evaluation of the selected NPLN NSW Programs: Evaluation of Focus on Reading 3-6 final report (PDF, 1.5MB) 
Summary:
The evaluation aimed to assess the effectiveness of the Focus on Reading 3-6 program, to identify the extent to which the program was operating as intended and to assess whether the program had improved the educational outcomes of Aboriginal students. Focus on Reading 3-6 was designed to provide professional learning support to classroom teachers in a school or community of schools. The main goals of the program were to increase teacher knowledge about how to develop fluent readers and to develop  comprehension and vocabulary skills based on effective evidence-based practices. The evaluation methodology comprised a knowledge review, scoping of data sets, site visits, and stakeholder interviews and surveys. In both the quantitative and qualitative research, the great majority of teachers and school staff reported increased knowledge and skills in teaching reading. Gains in mean reading scores were also observed for all student cohorts at Focus on Reading 3-6 schools.

Published in Evaluation repository
Wednesday, 15 November 2017

Closing the gap case studies

case studies graphic aboriginal

These case studies illustrate how five NSW primary schools have achieved high learning growth for their Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students. This work supports the 'Closing the Gap' strategy, a Council of Australian Governments commitment.

Aldavilla Public School (PDF, 700kB)

Ashmont Public School (PDF, 880kB)

Batemans Bay Public School (PDF, 850kB)

Doonside Public School (PDF, 1.5MB)

Westport Public School (PDF, 850kB)

Published in Research report

2016-mid-year-census-thumb

The mid-year census bulletin (PDF, 1.1MB)  summarises the enrolment results of the 2016 mid-year census of students in NSW government schools, and includes tables, maps and charts. The census of non-government schools undertaken by the Australian Government Department of Education is also completed on the same day. 

destinations thumb 2016 2 

The post-school destinations and expectation report (PDF, 2MB) presents key findings from the 2016 survey of secondary students' post-school destinations. Over 11,400 young people shared their experiences with the research team. Surveys were completed by early school leavers and year 12 completers across government and non-government schools. The report also presents the findings from a longitudinal follow-up with 4,430 students who responded to the survey in 2014.

Published in Research report
Wednesday, 28 September 2016

Schools: InBrief mid-year census 2015

Mid-Year Census 2015 

The mid-year census bulletin (PDF, 850kB) summarises the enrolment results of the 2015 mid-year census of students in NSW government schools, and includes tables, maps and charts. The census of non-government schools undertaken by the Australian Government Department of Education is also completed on the same day. 

Destinations destionations thumb

This report presents key findings from the 2015 survey of secondary students' post-school destinations. Nearly 13,300 people shared their experiences with the research team. surveys were completed by early school leavers and year 12 completers across government and non-government schools. The report also presents the findings from a longitudinal follow-up with 6,657 students who responded to the survey in 2014. 

Download the report (PDF, 1.7MB)

Download the data visualisation (PDF, 1MB)

Published in Research report

The Connected Communities interim evaluation report (PDF, 2MB) presents qualitative and quantitative findings regarding the implementation and achievement of key deliverables at the midpoint of the five year Connected Communities Strategy. The evaluation aims to answer how well the model has been formed and implemented across schools, as well as outcomes and impact of distinct components of the strategy.

Published in Research report

IPROWD Training Prog Eval 2012

 

Author: Dr John Mitchell

Evaluator company/business: John Mitchell and Associates

Year: 2012

URL or Pdf: Download the report on the Evaluation of the IPROWD Program (PDF, 7.23MB)

Summary: This report presents the findings of an evaluation of the effectiveness of the Indigenous Police Recruitment Our Way Delivery (IPROWD) training program developed by TAFE NSW, NSW Police and Charles Sturt University (CSU). The aim of the report was to analyse the program and identify a model of good practice as well as to assess the outcomes of the program. The research methods included a focus group, 38 interviews with stakeholders and also three case studies with past participants of the program. The authors found that IPROWD offered good support for students, demonstrated strong collaboration between all stakeholders and delivered high student outcomes. The report also provided recommendations for improving the implementation of the program.

Published in Evaluation repository
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