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These resources are part of a series that summarise the research on student wellbeing and engagement. They support the department's strategic goal of ensuring every student is known, valued and cared for.

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Published in Tell Them From Me

HomebushWestPS

Homebush West Public School case study (PDF, 400kB)

Related: The role of student engagement in the transition from primary to secondary school

 

Summary

Homebush West Public School has an effective approach in preparing students for secondary school

The school, in the inner west of Sydney, places a strong emphasis on preparing its students for the transition to secondary school. This case study looks at their ‘middle school’ approach, where Year 5 and 6 students are introduced to secondary school structures and routines to prepare them for the transition.

‘Middle school’ helps emphasise the important transition the students will face

When students reach Year 5, the concept of ‘middle school’ is introduced. The students are given more responsibility and are provided opportunities to step into leadership roles. There is also a focus on teaching students to be more responsible for their own learning, including setting learning goals and participating in peer and self-assessment.

The approach allows students to experience secondary school structures and routines

This involves individual student timetables that require students to change classrooms, classmates and teachers according to subject and ability. The students say that this approach allows them to build relationships with more than one teacher and get used to differing teaching approaches and teacher expectations. It also creates opportunities for students to continue making new friends across the cohort.

The staff at Homebush West collaborate, engage in reflective teaching and foster a culture of high expectations

With their unique ‘middle school’ approach, the staff at Homebush West recognise the need to continually refine practice and to be able to differentiate learning to meet the needs of all Year 5 and 6 students. They also attest to the high levels of organisation and communication that are needed to facilitate this approach. They have a constant focus on high expectations, helping students to recognise the opportunities of secondary school and feel confident and excited about the transition.

Published in Case studies

The role of student engagement in the transition from primary to secondary school (PDF, 2.2MB)

The role of student engagement in the transition from primary to secondary school (PDF, 2.2MB)

Related: Homebush West Public School case study

 

Summary

The primary to secondary transition marks a significant change for most students 

This transition period is important because of the impact it may have on students’ engagement in learning and their sense of belonging at school. This publication examines the relationship between students’ sense of belonging and other types of engagement across the transition from primary to secondary. It includes an analysis of 12,000 students who completed surveys in Year 6, and then again in Year 7. 

There is typically a decline in student engagement during the transition from Year 6 to Year 7

This decline is experienced even more by students from low-socioeconomic backgrounds and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students. Between Year 6 and Year 7, there is a decline in the percentage of students who value school outcomes and those who are trying hard to succeed. Students’ sense of belonging also declines over the transition.

Students’ experiences in primary school can have flow on effects for their engagement and learning in secondary

Students who report having a positive sense of belonging in Year 6 are more likely to have a positive sense of belonging in Year 7. Factors that help influence a student’s sense of belonging at the beginning of high school include their relationships with teachers and peers, the support they receive at school and at home, and school practice. 

Both primary and secondary schools can help make the transition easier for students

Primary schools should be attentive to Year 6 students’ sense of belonging and their relationships with teachers and peers, especially in the lead up to the transition. Secondary schools should develop strong, supportive student-teacher relationships as early as possible. There are more practical tips on how to do this in the publication and the Homebush West case study. 

Published in Learning Curve

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