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Cognitive load practice guide thumb

This course is part 2 to the Cognitive load theory course. It allows educators to engage with practical strategies to implement cognitive load theory. Participants will be asked to reflect on these strategies and relate them to their own practice. 

Mode of delivery: online 
Accredited hours: 2
myPL course code: RG04611
Themes: cognitive load, explicit instruction

Learn more about what the course involves.

Learn more about the two Cognitive load theory publications.

Enrol on myPL.

Published in Professional learning

cognitive load theory thumb

This course allows educators to engage with contemporary literature on cognitive load theory - how the human brain learns and stores knowledge. Participants will be asked to connect their understanding of the research to their own practice.

Mode of delivery: online 
Accredited hours: 1.5
myPL course code: RG03812
Themes: cognitive load, explicit instruction

Learn more about what the course involves.

Learn more about the Cognitive load theory publication. 

Enrol on myPL. 

Published in Professional learning

effect read

This course allows educators to engage with contemporary literature on reading instruction in the early years and connect it to their own practice.

Mode of delivery: online 
Accredited hours: 2
myPL course code: RG02939
Themes: phonics, reading, explicit instruction, early years

Learn more about what the course involves.

Learn more about the Effective reading instruction publication. 

Enrol on myPL. 

Published in Professional learning
Monday, 18 December 2017

Cognitive load theory - audio paper

Research that teachers really need to understand. Cognitive load theory is a theory of how the human brain learns and stores knowledge. It was recently described by British educationalist Dylan Wiliam as 'the single most important thing for teachers to know'. Grounded in a robust evidence base, cognitive load theory provides support for explicit models of instruction.

Read by Sally Kohlmayer, CESE.

Read the full publication.

cognitive load theory (PDF, 510kb)Cognitive load practice guide thumb

Cognitive load theory (PDF, 510kB)

Cognitive load theory in practice (PDF, 5.5MB)

One-page summary (PDF, 68kB)

Evidence summary poster for school staffrooms 

MyPL course part 1

MyPL course part 2

 

Background

This literature review provides an overview of cognitive load theory, which is a theory of how human brains learn and store knowledge. Dylan Wiliam has described cognitive load theory as ‘the single most important thing for teachers to know’. Grounded in a robust evidence base, cognitive load theory provides support for explicit models of instruction.

Main findings

The human brain can only process a small amount of new information at once, but it can process very large amounts of stored information.
Information is processed in the working memory, where small amounts of information are stored for a very short time. The average person can only hold about four ‘chunks’ of information in their working memory at one time.
Long-term memory is where large amounts of information are stored semi-permanently. Information is stored in the long-term memory in ‘schemas’, which provide a system for organising and storing knowledge.
If a student’s working memory is overloaded, there is a risk that they will not understand the content being taught and that their learning will be slow and/or ineffective.
With extensive practice, information can be automatically recalled from long-term memory with minimal conscious effort. This ‘automation’ reduces the burden on working memory, because when information can be accessed automatically, the working memory is freed up to learn new information.

Cognitive load theory provides support for explicit models of instruction.
Cognitive load theory is supported by a significant number of randomised controlled trials (RCTs). This large body of evidence indicates that instruction is most effective when it is designed according to the limitations of working memory.

Cognitive load theory indicates that when teaching students new content and skills, teachers are more effective when they provide explicit guidance accompanied by practice and feedback, not when they require students to discover for themselves many aspects of what they must learn.

Research from cognitive load theory has produced a number of instructional techniques that are directly transferable to the classroom.
These include the ‘worked example effect’, which is the widely replicated finding that novice learners who are given worked examples to study perform better on subsequent tests than learners who are required to solve the equivalent problems themselves.
Another finding is the 'expertise reversal effect', which shows that as students become more proficient at solving a particular type of problem, they should gradually be given more opportunities for independent problem solving.

More information

CESE has recently released a professional learning course based on this literature review, which will contribute 1.5 hours of registered professional learning for teachers.

 

 

Evidence summary poster for school staffrooms

To help share the evidence, Cognitive load theory is available as a summary poster (PDF, 119kB). 

What does the poster say?

About cognitive load theory

Dylan Wiliam has described cognitive load theory as ‘the single most important thing for teachers to know’. Grounded in a robust evidence base, cognitive load theory provides support for explicit models of instruction. The CESE literature review ‘Cognitive load theory: Research that teachers really need to understand’ explains the principles behind cognitive load theory and how it assists the human brain to learn and store knowledge.

Main findings

  • The human brain can only deal with a small amount of new information at once, but it can hold a very large amount of stored information.
  • Cognitive load theory provides support for explicit models of instruction.
  • Research from cognitive load theory has produced a number of instructional techniques that are directly transferable to the classroom.

How memory works 

  • Small amounts of short term information are processed in the working memory. 

The average person can only hold about four ‘chunks’ of information in their working memory at once.

  • Large amounts of information are stored semi-permanently in the long-term memory.

Information is stored in ‘schemas’ which provide a system for organising and storing knowledge.

  • Working memory can become overloaded.

If a student’s working memory is overloaded, they may not understand the content being taught.

  • Memory overload can be prevented.

With practice, and strategies to minimise cognitive load, information can be automatically recalled from long-term memory, freeing up the working memory to learn new information.

Published in Research report

effect read

Effective reading instruction in the early years of school (PDF, 3.7MB) 

Effective reading myPL course

 

Evidence summary poster for school staffrooms

To help share the evidence, Effective reading is available as a summary poster (PDF, 324kB).

What does the poster say?

Reading is a foundational, yet complex cognitive skill upon which other skills are built. Early success in reading is a powerful predictor of later achievement in a range of other academic areas. Individuals without literacy skills are at risk of being unable to participate in the workforce or engage fully in civic and social life.

Since 2000, there have been major reviews of the teaching of reading in Australia, the United Kingdom and the United States. These reviews, along with other research, have consistently identified five key components of effective reading programs: phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary and comprehension. The CESE literature review ‘Effective reading instruction in the early years of school’ summarises this research and concludes that, to be most successful, the five key components must be taught explicitly, sequentially and systematically.

The evidence identifies five key components of effective reading programs:

Phonemic awareness
The ability to hear the sounds in spoken words and understand that words are made up of sequences of sounds.

Phonics
Phonics instruction connects phonemes with written letters so that the reader can transfer knowledge of sounds to the printed word. Synthetic phonics’ is the approach with the most robust evidence base.

Fluency
The ability to read quickly and naturally with accuracy and expression. Fluency contains the skill of automaticity which allows a reader to recognise words quickly.

Vocabulary
When children ‘sound out’ a word, their brain connects the pronunciation of a sequence of sounds to a word in their vocabulary to find a logical match. If a match is not created because the word they are reading is not in their vocabulary, comprehension is interrupted.

Comprehension
The understanding and interpretation of what is read. Comprehension requires having a sufficient vocabulary.

Published in Research report

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