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a-review-effects-early-childhood-education-coverA review of the effects of early childhood education (PDF, 1013kB)

The information on this page is also available as a one-page summary (PDF, 171kB).

Background

This literature review summarises evidence of the relationship between early childhood education and cognitive and noncognitive outcomes for children. It also summarises evidence from a number of international longitudinal studies and randomised control trials. Australian evidence, though limited, has also been summarised.

 

Main findings

High quality early childhood education can improve children’s cognitive and non-cognitive outcomes
High-quality early childhood education is robustly associated with positive outcomes at school entry. Children who participate in early childhood education have higher cognitive and noncognitive development than children who do not participate. The benefits of early childhood education are stronger at higher levels of duration (years) and intensity (hours) of attendance. However, most early childhood education interventions yield short-term outcomes, with effects ‘fading out’ between one to three years after the intervention. The Australian evidence base on early childhood education effects is relatively limited. The extent to which early childhood education affects Australian children's development is largely unknown.
Disadvantaged children stand to gain the most from high quality early childhood education
High-quality early childhood education is particularly beneficial for children from disadvantaged backgrounds, as early childhood education provides cognitive and non-cognitive stimulation not available in the home learning environment. Interventions are best provided in the earliest years of life, as these yield higher developmental, social, and economic returns than interventions provided at later stages. Early childhood education interventions help to reduce inequalities in educational outcomes for disadvantaged children at the time of school entry. Small-scale, intensive early childhood education interventions (such as the well-known High/Scope Perry Preschool and Abecedarian programs), that incorporate additional components such as parenting programs and home visits from teachers are found to be most effective. Compared to more universal programs, smaller-scale, intensive interventions produce longer-term outcomes.

The positive effects of early childhood education programs are contingent upon, and proportionate to, their quality
The provision of high-quality early childhood education is beneficial for learning and development. Early childhood education quality typically comprises structural quality (characteristics such as the teacher to child ratio) and process quality (nature of interactions between children; their environment; and teachers and peers). A policy lever that will increase the positive effects of early childhood education participation is an increase in educational quality.

Recent analysis of early childhood education quality in Australia undertaken by Melbourne University’s E4Kids study, shows that there remains substantial room for quality improvement in Australian jurisdictions, including NSW.

 

Published in Research report

Child Protection Respectful Relps Ed Best Prac

Authors: Ciara Smyth, Ilan Katz

Evaluator company/business: Social Policy Research Centre (SPRC), University of New South Wales

Year: 2016

URL or Pdf: Download the report on Child Protection and Respectful Relationships Education and Best Practice in School Settings (PDF, 750kB)

Summary: This report aims to inform planning for enhancements to current child protection education programs. It provides a detailed review of child protection education literature, resources, and expert advice, and includes: identification of the elements of best practice; review findings to date of the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse; review of current approaches and resources in child protection education; review of one-off school programs/performances; and consultation with stakeholders. It clearly and concisely distils and compares key elements, and identifies common themes and the most important issues in child protection education. The report concludes that the NSW Department of Education's approach to child protection education is generally consistent with best practice, but would benefit from inbuilt evaluation and some revision. 

Published in Evaluation repository

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