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Thursday, 23 May 2019

Supporting school completion

Supporting school completion: The importance of engagement and effective teaching Learning Curve (PDF, 1.3MB)Supporting school completion: Resources and case studies for schools, teachers and parents/carers (PDF, 3MB)

The Supporting school completion: The importance of engagement and effective teaching (PDF, 1.3MB) explores links between students' engagement and experience of teaching practices in the middle of high school (Year 10) and their likelihood of completing Year 12.
The Supporting school completion: Resources and case studies for schools, teachers and parents/carers (PDF, 3MB) accompanies the Learning Curve and outlines practical strategies that may help facilitate high school completion and post-school transition.

 

Background

In Australia, socioeconomic status remains a key factor in school completion. By age 19, only 61% of the most disadvantaged students have completed Year 12, compared with 89% of the most advantaged students. It is important that all young people are given the opportunity to complete Year 12, or an equivalent pathway, particularly students who are at risk of not completing school due to their socioeconomic disadvantage.

Using data from the NSW Tell Them From Me (TTFM) secondary school student survey, this Learning Curve explores the links between students’ engagement and experience of teaching practices in the middle of high school (Year 10) and their likelihood of completing Year 12 two years later.

 

Main findings

Positive engagement and effective teaching increase all students’ chances of completing Year 12. When students develop positive relationships with teachers and are supported and challenged by teachers, they are more likely to complete school. Likewise, when students put effort in at school, see value in doing homework and believe school is important and useful for future success, they are also more likely to complete Year 12.

Engaging disadvantaged students increases their chances of completing school. When students from low-SES backgrounds report high levels of engagement and effective teaching practice in the middle of high school they are more likely to complete school than students from high-SES backgrounds who are not engaged in school.

Students from low-SES backgrounds are more likely to be disengaged in key predictors of school completion than students from high-SES backgrounds. In NSW, around half of all high-SES students in Year 10 report positive teacher relationships, positive attendance and value the outcomes of school, whereas only a quarter of low-SES students report a similar level of engagement.

This Learning Curve is accompanied by the resource, Supporting school completion: Resources for schools, teachers and parents/carers, which outlines practical strategies that may help facilitate high school completion and post-school transition. The resource includes four case studies from low-SES schools across metropolitan and regional NSW.

Some of the common themes that emerge from the four case studies are:

  • Developing strong teacher-student relations in the years prior to students finishing high school is an important foundation for successful post-school transition
  • Setting high expectations for all students fosters high aspirations and encourages students to work towards those aspirations
  • Providing information and support to students and parents about post-school transition broadens their awareness of available options for post-school life
  • Having dedicated resources within the school, through staff and/or ‘drop-in’ centres that students can draw on, improves students’ chances of making a successful transition.

 

Published in Learning Curve

LowSES Strategies improving learning

Authors: Shuyan Huo, Stephen Lamb

Evaluator company/business: Centre for International Research in Education Systems (CIRES)

URL or PDF: Download the report on Effective strategies for improving student learning: results from the low SES NP evaluation (PDF, 1.41MB)
Summary: This report was prepared by CIRES at Victoria University and is part of the evaluation of the National Partnership reform initiatives in low socio-economic status school communities (Low SES NP).The report focuses on student performance in the low SES schools in NSW that participated in the National Partnership (NP) agreements, and the extent to which changes in student performance are related to NP initiatives or other factors; and the initiatives that may be identified as making the strongest contributions to changes in student outcomes.

Published in Evaluation repository

Evaluation of school external partnerships (University of Canberra)

June 2014 progress report 5 (PDF, 1MB)

November 2013 progress report 4

September 2013 progress report 3

December 2012 progress report 2

June 2012 progress report 1 (PDF, 1.1MB)

Evaluation of school staffing, management and accountability initiatives (University of Melbourne)

The report shares findings from a survey of school principals of schools participating in the low socio-economic status (SES) Smarter Schools National Partnerships (SSNP). Responses were received from more than 59 per cent of schools participating in the low-SES SSNP across all three education sectors. The report provides valuable information about the implementation and perceived effectiveness of low-SES SSNP staffing, management and accountability initiatives across school contexts.

July 2014 progress report 6 (PDF, 3MB)

May 2014 progress report 5

October 2013 progress report 4

May 2013 progress report 3

October 2012 progress report 2

April 2012 progress report 1 (PDF, 1MB)

 

Go to the SSNP annual reports

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