Publications filter

Post-school-destinations-annual-report-2017-thumbPost-school-destinations-technical-report-2017-thumb

The 2017 post-school destinations and expectations annual report (PDF, 3.3MB) presents key findings from the 2017 survey of secondary students' post-school destinations. Over 6,995 young people shared their experiences with the research team. Surveys were completed by early school leavers and Year 12 completers across government and non-government schools. The report also presents the findings from a longitudinal follow-up with 2,704 students who responded to the survey in 2014 and 3,342 students who responded in 2016.

 

The 2017 post-school destinations technical report (PDF, 3.5MB) outlines the project background and overview, survey methodology, questionnaire design and data processing undertaken by the Social Research Council (SRC) to produce the annual report. It also includes materials used by SRC to undertake the project.

 

About the report

The post-school destinations report provides information about:
• post-school education pathways, attainments and destinations of young people in NSW
• factors that drive engagement, retention, education achievement and pathway choices for young people in NSW
• findings from longitudinal follow-ups with students who responded to surveys in 2014 and 2016, and Year 10 students in 2017.
Over 13,000 early school leavers and Year 12 completers across government and non-government schools completed surveys in 2017.
The NSW Department of Education and NSW Skills Board have collaborated on the annual survey since 2014.

Main findings

Further education and training was the most common post-school destination
The majority of Year 12 completers (69.9%) and early school leavers (55.4%) were in some form of education and training six months after leaving school. However, the proportion of Year 12 completers entering some form of education and training has continued to decline since peaking in 2015, and the proportion of Year 12 completers and early school leavers entering VET also decreased in 2017.

Post-school destinations differ between Year 12 completers and early school leavers
The main post-school destination among Year 12 completers continued to be a Bachelor degree (50.1%), however Year 12 completers identifying as Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander had lower rates of entering a Bachelor degree (23.9%) than other Year 12 completers. The main post-school destination for early school leavers continued to be an apprenticeship (30.0%).
Reasons for leaving school early varied
The most common self-reported reasons for leaving school early continue to relate to wanting to pursue employment and career opportunities, school ‘not being for them’ and not liking school or teachers. Less frequently cited reasons included not coping at school or failing subjects, finding school boring, wanting to study elsewhere, ill-health and being bullied.

Published in Research report

schools-in-brief-cover-image-2017

The mid-year census bulletin (PDF, 620kB) presents enrolment data from various years to 2017 using mid-year census data. It includes tables, maps and charts on NSW government schools and students. 

2016 statistical bulletin thumb

The 2016 schools and students statistical bulletin (PDF, 1MB) presents tables and charts about NSW schools and students. Data is from the census of both government and non-government students, undertaken in August 2016.

stats bulletin 2015 thumb

The 2015 schools and students statistical bulletin (PDF, 1.7MB) presents tables and charts about NSW schools and students. Data is from the census of both government and non-government students, undertaken in August 2015.

The Connected Communities interim evaluation report (PDF, 2MB) presents qualitative and quantitative findings regarding the implementation and achievement of key deliverables at the midpoint of the five year Connected Communities Strategy. The evaluation aims to answer how well the model has been formed and implemented across schools, as well as outcomes and impact of distinct components of the strategy.

Published in Research report

Norta Norta Sponsorship Prog Final Rpt Exec Summ

 

Authors: Louise Taggart, Diana Eqbal, Meg Dione and Barry Laing

Evaluator company/business: Quality Assurance Team Policy, Planning and Reporting Unit, NSW Department of Education

Year: 2013

URL or PDF: Download the Final report of the program evaluation of Norta Norta Individual Sponsorship Program - executive summary (PDF, 371kB)

Summary:  The evaluation of the Year 11 and 12 Norta Norta Individual Sponsorship Program aimed to measure the extent to which Norta Norta has achieved its objectives in improving learning and levels of achievement, creating more positive attitudes, strengthening engagement with school and improving attendance and retention for Year 12 Aboriginal students. Data was gathered from school staff, students, tutors and Higher School Certificate results. More than 90 per cent of school staff and tutor survey respondents rated the overall program as either highly or moderately effective. The apparent retention rate for Aboriginal students increased from 33 per cent in 2009 to 43 per cent in 2012. 

Published in Evaluation repository

 Norta Norta Sponsorship Prog Interim Rpt Exec Summ

Evaluator company/business: Policy, Planning and Reporting Unit, NSW Department of Education

Year: 2012

URL or PDF: Download the interim report of the Norta Norta individual sponsorship program evaluation (PDF, 432kB).

Summary:  The purpose of this formative evaluation was to measure the extent to which the Norta Norta Individual Sponsorship Program had achieved its objectives of improving engagement, attendance and retention of Year 12 Aboriginal students. Data was gathered by online surveys from school staff, students and tutors from more than 100 schools and interviews with principals, teachers, Aboriginal staff, students, tutors and parents and community members in a sample of 18 schools across eight NSW regions. The study found that almost 80% of all eligible students took part in the sponsorship program in 2011. While the authors noted that was difficult to directly attribute improvements in learning outcomes and student engagement to Norta Norta alone, early observations indicated an improvement in educational outcomes for students such as improved course completion; improved engagement with schooling in general; improved attendance and increased rates of completion of Year 12 and completion of the HSC and enhanced post‐school aspirations. 

Published in Evaluation repository

Publications advanced search

Accessible documents

If you find a CESE publication is not accessible, please contact us

Waratah-NSWGovt-Reverse