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Impact of mobile digital devices in schools (PDF, 2MB)

Impact of mobile digital devices in schools (PDF, 2MB) - a literature review on the impact of non-educational mobile digital device use on student wellbeing. 

Published in Research report

what works best

This course focuses on the participant connecting educational theory and research with their context.

Mode of delivery: online 
Accredited hours: 2
myPL course code: RG04031
Themes: high expectations, explicit teaching, effective feedback, use of data to inform practice, classroom management, wellbeing, collaboration

Learn more about what the course involves.

Learn more about the What works best publication. The What works best reflection guide is another useful resource for completing this professional learning. 

Enrol on myPL

Published in Professional learning

student wellbeing

This course allows educators to engage with contemporary literature on student wellbeing and connect it to their own practice.

Mode of delivery: online 
Accredited hours: 1.5
myPL course code: RG03815
Themes: wellbeing, engagement, social and emotional learning

Learn more about what the course involves.

Learn more about the Student wellbeing publication.

Enrol on myPL. 

Published in Professional learning
Friday, 20 July 2018

Supporting students' learning

Supporting students' learning - insights from students, parents and teachers (PDF, 1MB)Supporting-students-learning-resources-thumb

The Supporting students' learning - insights from students, parents and teachers (PDF, 1MB) learning curve presents findings from the 2016 Tell Them From Me school surveys completed by primary and secondary students, parents/carer and teachers in NSW government schools. Students provide feedback on how much support they receive from their teachers and their parents/carers, while responses from teachers and parent/carers indicate how much support they provide in school and at home, respectively. It draws on all three perspectives to explore the provision of advocacy and support and how this varies for different groups of students at different stages of school. 

The Supporting students' learning - resources and case studies for schools, teachers and parents (PDF, 808kB) accompanies the learning curve, providing evidence-based strategies and two case studies that describe how to create supportive learning environments. 

Read the audio paper transcript (PDF, 106kB). 

Download the poster (PDF, 120kB).

 

Background

Alongside effective teaching practices, students need a supportive learning environment to succeed. In an education context, advocacy and support for learning refers to the active consideration of, and support for, students’ academic and wellbeing needs.

Main findings

  • The results show that students and teachers report different levels of advocacy and support in school depending on the stage of schooling. Students’ perceptions of teacher support start to decline in the final years of primary school. Secondary school students perceive teacher support to dip in the middle years of school, before improving in Years 11 and 12. Teachers report that they increase the amount of classroom support they provide to students in key schooling years (Years 5-6 and Years 10-12).
  • In NSW, both parents and students report a continual decline in the frequency of supportive interactions at home that relate to school.
  • While there are some differences between boys’ and girls’ experiences of advocacy and support in school and at home, there is a large disadvantage gap between low and high-SES students. These findings suggest that more can be done to make sure all students have access to support sources, which they can turn to for advice and encouragement.
  • Accompanying this Learning Curve, CESE has used evidence-based practices and local examples to provide practical strategies for fostering advocacy and support in schools and at home. Case studies on Whalan Public School and Sir Joseph Banks High School highlight some of the programs and initiatives these schools have used to achieve high levels of advocacy at school. This qualitative research shows that schools that provide high levels of advocacy at school are also committed to strengthening the homeschool partnership for their students.

More information

The NSW Department of Education Strategic Plan 2018-2022 includes the commitment to ensure that every student is known, valued and cared for in our schools. School advocacy and support for learning are necessary components for happy and successful students. Schools can use the department’s Tell Them From Me surveys to engage with, clarify and strengthen the important relationship between teachers, parents and schools by providing an evidence-based platform to capture feedback. This knowledge can then help build an accurate and timely picture that schools can use for practical improvements.

The summary on this page is also available as a PDF. Download the summary of the two publications (PDF, 180kB).

Published in Learning Curve
Wednesday, 09 May 2018

Student wellbeing - audio paper

 

This audio paper explores how student wellbeing is defined, the relationship between wellbeing, schools and outcomes, and school elements in improving student wellbeing.

Read by Kate Griffiths, CESE.
Download the transcript (PDF, 141kB) or go to the full publication

Tell Them From Me Student Survey Trial Final Rpt 2014

Authors: Marita Merlene, Wendy Hodge, Kerry Hart, Alexandra Ellinson, Ofir Thaler

Evaluator company/business: ARTD Consultants

Year: 2014

URL or PDF: Download the Evaluation of the 'Tell Them From Me' student survey trial (PDF, 1.14MB).

Summary: This formative evaluation provided insight and advice for the future implementation of student surveys. Mixed methods were used —surveys, case studies in five schools and semi-structured interviews. 172 secondary schools and 55 primary schools took part in the pilot  online student survey and were approached to participate in the evaluation. The evaluation found that principals favoured the continuation of the student survey and the introduction of similar surveys for teachers and for parents.

Published in Evaluation repository

 Clontarf Rpt

Authors: Katrina Yu, Duncan Rintoul, Steven Hao, Ian Watkins, Wai-Yin Wan

Evaluator company/business: Centre for Education Statistics and Evaluation, NSW Department of Education

Year: 2017

URL or PDF: Download the Evaluation of the NSW Clontarf Academies Program 2017 (PDF, 2MB)

Summary: This report presents the findings of CESE's evaluation of the Clontarf Academies program, which currently operates in 25 schools across NSW. The scope covers the 12 Academies established before 2016, with a focus on the seven established in 2012. This evaluation draws on administrative data on school attendance, retention, suspensions, NAPLAN participation, post-school outcomes and contact with the criminal justice system, as well as stakeholder interviews, site visits and a survey of Clontarf participants. The evaluation has three components: a process evaluation, an outcome evaluation and an economic evaluation.

Published in Evaluation repository

anti bullying thumb

Anti-bullying interventions literature review (PDF, 1.1MB)

One-page summary (PDF, 251kB)

Evidence summary poster for school staffrooms

Anti-bullying interventions myPL course 

Background

This literature review provides the evidence base for the department’s anti-bullying strategy. Released in 2017, the NSW Anti-bullying Strategy brings together evidence-based resources and information to support schools, parents and carers, and students to prevent and respond to bullying effectively.
Bullying can be face-to-face, covert or online. It has three main features: it involves repeated actions, is intended to cause distress or harm, and is grounded in an imbalance of power.

In 2015, 14.8 per cent of Australian students reported being bullied at least a few times per month. Bullying peaks during the transition from primary school to high school, before decreasing to low levels by the end of high school. Boys tend to bully more than girls, however, girls use more covert bullying than boys.

Main findings

Anti-bullying programs reduce bullying behaviours by an average of 20 – 23 per cent.

The most effective anti-bullying interventions:

• take a holistic, whole-school and whole-community approach, which includes promoting awareness of anti-bullying interventions

• include educational content in the classroom that allows students to develop social and emotional competencies, and to learn appropriate ways to respond to bullying – both as a student who experiences bullying and as a bystander

• provide support and sustainable professional development for school staff on how best to enhance understanding, skills and self-efficacy to address and prevent bullying behaviours

• ensure systematic implementation and evaluation.

There are Australian and international examples of whole-schools approaches that have the characteristics common to effective anti-bullying interventions and have been subjected to program evaluations. Australian examples are the National Safe Schools Framework, Positive Behaviour for Learning, Friendly Schools, KidsMatter and MindMatters. International examples are the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program (Norway), Sheffield Anti-Bullying Project (England), Seville Anti-Bullying in School Project (Spain) and KiVa Anti-Bullying Program (Finland).
Schools need greater support to maximise the outcomes of anti-bullying interventions and to identify what is likely to be successful based on their specific contexts and requirements. There is very little available currently in the way of specific advice to guide schools in their choice of anti-bullying programs.

More information

Visit the department's anti-bullying website.

Related publications:

The role of student engagement in the transition from primary to secondary school. 

 

Evidence summary poster for school staffrooms

To help share the evidence, Anti-bullying interventions is available as a summary poster (PDF, 1.4MB)

What does the poster say?

  • In 2015, 14.8% of Australian students reported being bullied at least a few times per month.
  • Bullying peaks during the transition from primary school to high school.
    It decreases to low levels by the end of high school. Boys tend to bully more than girls, however, girls use more covert bullying than boys.

  • Anti-bullying programs reduce bullying behaviours by an average of 20-23%.

The NSW Anti-bullying Strategy

In 2017, the Centre for Education Statistics and Evaluation (CESE) released a literature review on effective anti-bullying interventions in schools. This review became the evidence base for the NSW Department of Education’s Anti-bullying Strategy. This strategy brings together evidence-based resources and information to support schools, parents and carers, and students to prevent and respond to bullying effectively.
Bullying can be face-to-face, covert or online.

It has three main features:
• it involves repeated actions
• is intended to cause distress or harm, and
• is grounded in an imbalance of power.
The most effective anti-bullying interventions:
• take a holistic, whole-school and whole-community approach
• include educational content in the classroom that allows students to learn appropriate ways to respond to bullying
• provide support and sustainable professional development for school staff
• ensure systematic implementation and evaluation.

Published in Learning Curve

School Staff Health Wellbeing Grant Project Final Rpt 2015

Authors: Meg Dione-Rodgers, Louise Taggart, Susan Harriman

Evaluator company/business: Quality Assurance Team, Policy, Planning and Reporting Unit, NSW Department of Education

Year: 2015

URL or PDF: Download the report on the Teachers Health Fund - School Staff Health and Wellbeing Grants Program (PDF, 1.44MB)
Summary: The evaluation of the School Staff Health and Wellbeing Grants Program was commissioned to describe the implementation of the funding program in nine schools and identify the effects on staff health and wellbeing, students and the school community. The methodology included: document reviews; interviews with program managers; and analysis of school self-evaluation reports. The evaluation found that the program generally worked well, with staff participants reporting health and wellbeing benefits such as increased fitness and flexibility, greater social interaction and improved staff morale.

Published in Evaluation repository

ttfm case studies

Tell Them From Me is an online survey system that assists schools to capture the views of students, teachers and parents. The following case studies highlight how a variety of government schools have used Tell Them From Me survey data to identify and make broad improvements to student engagement, wellbeing and teaching practices.

Macquarie Fields High School (PDF, 350kB) Using Tell Them From Me data as a starting point for consultation with the broader school community.

Northlakes High School (PDF, 1.4MB) Using Tell Them From Me data to identify issues and inform responses.

Berry Public School (PDF, 250kB) Using Tell Them From Me to capture student, teacher and parent voice and inform responses.

Fairvale High School (PDF, 960kB) Using Tell Them From Me to set targets for school improvement in the school plan.

Hammondville Public School (PDF, 250kB) Using Tell Them From Me to improve teaching practices.

Published in Tell Them From Me
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