Publications filter

 The impact of bushfires on student wellbeing and student learning (PDF, 1.3MB)

The impact of bushfires on student wellbeing and student learning (PDF, 1.3MB)

The catastrophic bushfires that occurred across NSW in late 2019 to early 2020 have had a significant impact on school operations. In response to the fires, the NSW Premier declared a State of Emergency on three separate occasions and the bushfires received wide media coverage both in Australia and internationally. A large number of schools temporarily ceased operation during the bushfire crisis. In February 2020, the NSW Department of Education formed a new Bushfire Relief Strategy Directorate charged with developing a strategy that provides direction for managing future bushfire seasons. The strategy outlines the department’s approach to assisting schools to recover from bushfires across the short, medium and long term.

This paper aims to support the strategy by bringing together the available research on the potential impact of natural disasters on student wellbeing and student learning, contextualised to school education in NSW. The first section describes the research on students’ distress and mental health in the short-term and long-term stages after bushfires and other natural disasters. The second section looks at the potential impact of bushfires on student learning and considers the implications for NSW schools in relation to student learning, student assessment, and disaster education.


We are committed to providing accessible content for all users and are working towards providing this PDF in a more accessible format. To request an accessible version, please contact us.

Tuesday, 14 July 2020

Learning from home snapshots

download the explainer (PDF, 1MB)Remote learning: An evidence-based explainer –  read online or download the explainer (PDF, 1MB)

The explainer summarises the research in relation to effective remote learning and highlights key considerations for learning in the face of COVID-19.

 

Snapshots

Bullimbal School (PDF, 539kB)Caves Beach Public School (PDF, 440kB)Hurlstone Agricultural High School (PDF, 376kB)Lethbridge Park Public School (PDF, 608kB)Rowena Public School (PDF, 525kB)Strathfield Girls High School (PDF, 489kB)Yeoval Central School (PDF, 520kB)

Bullimbal School (PDF, 539kB)

Caves Beach Public School (PDF, 440kB)

Hurlstone Agricultural High School (PDF, 376kB)

Lethbridge Park Public School (PDF, 608kB)

Rowena Public School (PDF, 525kB)

Strathfield Girls High School (PDF, 489kB)

Yeoval Central School (PDF, 520kB)

The snapshots were produced when the majority of students in NSW were learning from home in order to provide examples of how learning could be continued from home. A number of common themes emerged across the snapshot schools, including:

  • prioritising student equity, wellbeing and engagement
  • strategic and flexible use of resources
  • establishing clear expectations for all
  • effective and regular communication
  • understanding the local context and responding effectively
  • drawing on collective expertise to build capacity and manage teacher workloads.

 


 

We are committed to providing accessible content for all users and are working towards providing these PDFs in more accessible formats. To request an accessible version, please contact us.

 high academic expectations thumbTTFM-reflection-high-expectations-thumbHigh-academic-expectations-poster-thumb

These resources are part of a series that summarise the research on student wellbeing and engagement. They support the department's strategic goal of ensuring every student is known, valued and cared for.

Related resources

Sense belonging thumbTTFM-reflection-belonging-thumbsense-belonging-poster-thumb

These resources are part of a series that summarise the research on student wellbeing and engagement. They support the department's strategic goal of ensuring every student is known, valued and cared for.

Related resources

Monday, 29 June 2020

Supporting advocacy at school

advocacy-paper-thumbTTFM-reflection-advocacy-thumbadvocacy-poster-thumb

These resources are part of a series that summarise the research on student wellbeing and engagement. They support the department's strategic goal of ensuring every student is known, valued and cared for.

Related resources

Supporting school improvement: Using the Tell Them From Me student, parent and teacher surveys (PDF, 1.2MB)

Supporting school improvement: Using the Tell Them From Me student, parent and teacher surveys (PDF, 1.2MB)

The Tell Them From Me student, parent and teacher surveys have been used in NSW public schools since 2013. They provide data on a range of aspects of school life, practices and procedures from the perspectives of students, parents and teachers. 

This paper provides a background on the surveys and how they can be used to inform school planning and decision-making.

Related resources

 


 We are committed to providing accessible content for all users and are working towards providing this PDF in a more accessible format. To request an accessible version, please contact us.

BestPractices2020 v1

Best practicescreating a positive learning environment (PDF, 70kB)

Using the department's remote learning resources

 

The modern classroom is ever-changing. The following evidence-based teaching strategies can assist teachers as they support students’ education continuity, in an online and/or remote learning environment.

Explicit teaching

  • Clearly show students what to do and how to do it (for example, providing explanation videos, hard/soft copy worked examples or completed exemplars).
  • Explain the purpose and relevance of all tasks (for example, providing visual lesson outlines, learning intentions, the activities or key instructions, and the success criteria for the lesson).

Read more on explicit teaching in What works best: 2020 update and What works best in practice.

Manage cognitive load

  • Cut out inessential information.
  • Present all the essential information together.
  • Simplify complex information by presenting it both orally and visually.
  • Encourage students to visualise concepts and procedures that they have learnt.

Read more on cognitive load in Cognitive load theory and Managing cognitive load through effective presentations.

Support routines

  • Provide daily to-do lists and day schedule.
  • Have students submit work regularly.

Read more on classroom management in Classroom management and Leading from home – school planning.

Maintain high expectations

  • Be clear about what is expected of students (for example, student behaviour and tasks).
  • Provide effective feedback that includes constructive and actionable steps on how students can improve.
  • Encourage student personal best goal setting.

Read more on high expectations in How high expectations and engagement in primary school drive student learning and What works best: 2020 update.

Collaboration

  • Draw on collective teacher expertise (for example, co-plan lessons, share best practice models and resources).
  • Regularly inform parents and carers of their child’s progress, learning expectations and learning goals.

Read more on collaboration in Improving high school engagement, classroom practices and achievement and What works best: 2020 update

Active supervision

  • Check-in daily with students.

Read more on active supervision in Classroom management and Learning from home – delivery of learning.

Support student wellbeing

  • Encourage student feedback and suggestions to help students feel connected to their learning.
  • Engage students in positive self-talk, discuss issues when they arise and encourage students to ask for help.
  • Provide tips on how students can manage their time effectively.
  • Promote emotional safety through preventative strategies, such as teaching students self-regulation (for example, breathing and meditation exercises).

Read more on student wellbeing in Capturing and measuring student voice and Improving high school engagement, classroom practices and achievement.

For emotional safety preventative and responsive strategies, read Trauma-informed practice in schools: An explainer.

Support a safe online/remote learning environment

  • Provide students and parents information on respectful, responsible and safe use of digital devices.
  • Clearly communicate procedures for staff, parents and carers to report concerns or online bullying.

Read more on online safety in Anti-bullying interventions in schools, on the digital citizenship website, the eSafety website or download the eSafety toolkit for schools.

 

Using the department’s remote learning resources

Learning from home

The department’s dedicated Learning from home webpages provide resources and advice for teachers and parents including information on:

Literacy and numeracy resources for teachers

The Literacy and numeracy website supports the explicit teaching and learning of literacy and numeracy in schools by providing the latest resources including:

  • learning progressions
  • EAL/D learning progressions
  • PLAN2
  • podcasts
  • case studies

Teachers can also access the Literacy and numeracy professional learning.

The elements of effective professional development (PDF, 700kB)

The elements of effective professional development (PDF, 700kB)

 

Summary

Professional development of teachers is a career-long process

Teacher professional development begins with initial teacher education and continues until retirement, and it is generally agreed by teachers and other education professionals to be a good investment of education dollars.

Professional development is available to all teachers in NSW.

Professional development positively impacts student outcomes

One of the most cited meta-analyses looking at the effect of professional development on student outcomes calculates an effect size of 0.541. It claims that average students would increase their achievement by 21 percentile points if their teachers participated in quality professional development.

However, a question arises:

In teaching what are the elements of professional development that improve outcomes for students?

Available research reveals that the following elements of professional development have a positive impact on student outcomes:

  • A focus on teachers' content knowledge of the subject matter.
  • A focus on teachers' knowledge of how students learn.
  • Alignment to clear and specific contextual goals
  • Support from school leaders.

There is insufficient evidence on the effectiveness of the following elements of professional development:

  • The appropriate number of contact hours or delivery timeframes for professional development programs.
  • The effectiveness of professional learning communities.

This is not to say that professional development programs of a longer duration and professional learning communities do not work to improve student outcomes. However, there is no conclusive evidence to definitively support these elements.

More evidence is needed

Many studies investigate the impact of professional development on teacher knowledge, teaching practice and teacher satisfaction. Far fewer take the extra step of examining the impact of professional development on student achievement.

There is a clear need for further research that focuses on which elements of professional development have the greatest impact on student learning outcomes.


 

1Yoon et al 2007, ‘Reviewing the evidence on how teacher professional development affects student achievement’, Issues & Answers Report REL 2007-No. 033: 14.

Trauma-informed practice in schools: An explainer (PDF, 570kB)trauma-informed-discussion-guide

Trauma-informed practice in schools: An explainer (PDF, 722kB)

Discussion guide (PDF, 192kB)

This explainer briefly summarises the evidence on trauma-informed practice within an educational context. It is intended as a brief introduction to the topic for teachers, principals and other school staff. 

The accompanying discussion guide has been created to support principals, executive, teachers and school staff to unpack and reflect on the explainer, and to explore implications for their schools. 

workforce profile 2017

The Workforce profile of the NSW teaching profession 2017 (PDF, 5MB) includes data that details teachers' characteristics and experiences from entry into initial teacher education through to exit from the profession. The report provides information on both government and non-government school teachers, early childhood teachers and teachers in training.

The 2017 report builds on the data presented in the following reports:

Page 2 of 9

Publications advanced search

Accessible documents

If you find a CESE publication is not accessible, please contact us

Waratah-NSWGovt-Reverse